Ecommerce Marketing / Enterprise Ecommerce

How Landing Pages Catapult Brands to Beyond $20,000,000 in Online Revenue

Mili Mehta / 15 min read

“Don’t judge a book by its cover”

A short piece of wisdom we have all heard and, most likely, are all guilty of doing anyway.

But don’t feel too bad, because, apparently, we can’t actually help it.s

As humans, we are predominantly visual creatures, meaning that:

“Wrappers in which things come not only powerfully affect what interests us but also how we react to the contents we find inside.”

We can’t help but judge:

  • Books by their covers.
  • Food by its appearance.
  • And, most importantly, brands by their landing pages.

Landing pages are a neglected but increasingly crucial brand wrapper – a key initial impression and touchpoint for many new shoppers.

Unfortunately, ecommerce landing pages represent a very neglected but increasingly crucial brand wrapper — a key initial impression and touchpoint for many new shoppers.

And even for those returning ones, ecommerce landing pages can play an important role in motivating traffic to continue engaging with your brand and ultimately convincing them to make a purchase.

Even more unfortunate is the fact that while brands today spend large portions of their marketing budget driving traffic to their digital storefronts, that paid traffic rarely reaches its full potential — as evidenced by subpar conversion rates.

That untapped value is a consequence of disjointed onsite experiences coupled with the simple truth that:

Consumers judge brands based on their preliminary experiences, abandoning them in response.

So, considering these two factors:

  1. The key role that initial landing page impression can play in the consumer journey.
  2. The painful fact that, as long as that traffic isn’t purchasing, you are likely going to have to pay for them again and again until they do.

Why not do everything you in your power to ensure that your landing page experiences are as seamless (and as revenue-driving) as possible?

This blog post will walk you through why landing pages are becoming increasingly important to positive and profitable ecommerce customer experiences.

We’ll also explain what you can do to optimize the value of your own landing pages – right now.

What is a Landing Page?

A landing page is a standalone webpage targeted to a specific cohort of your traffic, with the aim of providing a more relevant experience in order to achieve the ultimate objective of driving that cohort toward conversion.

A landing page can be defined as a:

Single page on a website that traffic is driven to from a specific campaign, whether that be an advertisement or an email campaign, for instance.

The definition and application varies from organization to organization.

The real and long-term goal of landing pages, as I see it however, is one that Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos envisioned back in 1999:

“We have 6.2 million customers, we should have 6.2 million storefronts.”

In other words, because every customer is unique and requires different types of attention and engagement to be convinced to purchase, businesses should adapt accordingly by tailoring their stores to each of those individual customers.

Enter ecommerce landing pages.

While retailers can’t be expected to actually create unique websites for every user, they can create unique digital storefronts.

Landing pages represent the tool through which brands can adapt to the user in question, creating relevant and positive-impression making experiences for each of the individuals engaging with your brand.

This is hyper-personalization.

By taking a customer-first, hyper-personalized approach to your landing page optimization strategy, you will do more than create impactful landing pages that guide your traffic in the precise direction you want them to go. Decision making is less about logic and more about the emotions that influence user reactions when users are on a personalized landing page.

You will simultaneously unlock incremental value from each of those individuals, driving higher returns for your business as a result.

Maximize Top of Funnel Leads

Relevance is going to be your key competitive advantage in 2018.

You’re not going to be able to pull that off without becoming as 1:1 as possible in your communications with your top-of-funnel prospects.

It all starts on-site by identifying your audience through opt-in campaigns. Join BounceX and BigCommerce as we guide you through how identification begins on your site and how to guide the customer journey to increase opt-ins.

Reserve your seat now.

The Difference Between Landing Pages and Product Pages

The great thing about ecommerce brands is that you already have versions of landing pages: your product pages.

There are key differences between these two, however.

These differences may seem subtle in the chart above, but their impact is critical.

The main difference here is one of purpose:

  • Landing Pages are used to drive paid for, targeted traffic back to a specific conversion. Landing pages are considered low- funnel (closer to the final sale).
  • Product pages are used to attract browsers (both organic, direct and less targeted paid audiences) back to a page and allow for additional browsing. Product pages are considered mid-funnel, when consumers are still comparing options.

Page UXLanding PagesProduct PagesPurpose
Site NavigationNoYesBecause landing pages are most often used in advertisements to drive targeted consumers back to a specific conversion, landing pages strip the individual page of any other click through opportunities outside of the main CTA. This includes removing site navigation.
Clear Call to Action (CTA)YesYesBoth landing pages and product pages have a clear CTA (add to cart). On landing pages, however, this is the only CTA – and often uses language more targeted to the targeted audience being driven to the page.
Additional CTAsNoYesAgain, landing pages only have 1 CTA. Product pages often include a site navigation for additional browsing as well as similar or related products. Many product pages include multiple lower-level CTAs for those who are not yet ready for purchase.
Product Description + Additional ContentYesYesBoth landing pages and product pages include additional product copy. On landing pages, however, the copy is often re-written for a specific audience, rather than a more general organic or direct audience.
Optimized for SEOPotentially, but not necessarily YesLanding pages can be optimized for SEO, but many brands have landing pages unindexed so that the offer on the page remains specific to the targeted audience, and to better measure conversion rate and campaign success in terms of ROAS (return on ad spend). Product pages are heavily optimized for SEO, as one of their main goals is to attract organic traffic.

Let’s look at a few examples of each.

Inclusion of site navigation on page.

  • Landing page: No
  • Product page: Yes

Because landing pages are most often used in advertisements to drive targeted consumers back to a specific conversion, landing pages strip the individual page of any other click through opportunities outside of the main CTA.

This includes removing site navigation.

Clear CTA (call to action).

  • Landing page: Yes
  • Product page: Yes

Both landing pages and product pages have a clear CTA (add to cart).

On landing pages, however, this is the only CTA – and often uses language more targeted to the targeted audience being driven to the page.

Additional CTAs.

  • Landing pages: No
  • Product pages: Yes

Again, landing pages only have one CTA.

Product pages often include a site navigation for additional browsing as well as similar or related products.

Many product pages include multiple lower-level CTAs for those who are not yet ready for purchase.

Product description and additional content.

  • Landing pages: Yes
  • Product pages: Yes

Both landing pages and product pages include additional product copy.

On landing pages, however, the copy is often re-written for a specific audience, rather than a more general organic or direct audience.

Landing pages often have less copy than typical product pages.

Optimized for SEO.

  • Landing pages: No, not necessarily
  • Product pages: Yes

Landing pages can be optimized for SEO, but many brands have landing pages unindexed so that the offer on the page remains specific to the targeted audience, and to better measure conversion rate and campaign success in terms of ROAS (return on ad spend).

Product pages are heavily optimized for SEO, as one of their main goals.

You can choose to optimize your landing page for SEO if you desire.

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4 Steps to Implementing a Landing Page Strategy

Here is how most online brands run advertising campaigns:

  • Launch a Facebook of Google PPC ad.
  • Drop shoppers who click on those ads on specific category or product pages
  • See low conversion rates on those product pages as customers begin to browse other sections of the site
  • Lose the ability to properly measure ROAS (return on ad spend).

This is occurring even outside ads, but in campaigns in general.

Here’s how most people are running email marketing campaigns for instance:

  • Launch an email marketing campaign targeted to a specific customer segment
  • Drop that customer off on a specific product page
  • See low conversion rates on those product pages as customers begin to browse other sections of the site
  • Lose the ability to properly measure ROI (return on investment) for the email campaign, and LTV (customer lifetime value) generated from individual campaigns.

In both situations, you’ve now created an attribution issue.

Why does attribution matter?

Brands quickly scaling past $5,000,000 in annual online revenue must get really, really good at attribution.

Attribution is the clear understanding of sales produced by each individual channel.

As your brand scales, it is likely that some channels will work much better for you, whereas others either need improvement, or can be dropped to swift focus and double down on where resource spend in producing high sales.

Without proper attribution understanding (ROI and ROAS from all channels), you cannot make educated strategy implementations.

Bad data returns bad investment.

Landing pages help to alleviate this issue.

If you take one thing away from this article, let it be this:

Do not simply drop targeted traffic off on any page on your website, left to either convert or not convert.

Instead, use landing pages for your targeted audiences.

Here’s how to know when you should create a landing page:

When to Create an Ecommerce Landing Page

Funnel StageCampaign TypePage ContentsPotential CTA
Top of FunnelLookalike AudiencesCreate a landing page that tells your brand story including who you are, why you exist and what you believe in. Also show off social proof (from customers and media outlets, if possible) and begins to build community with the lookalike audience.Join the Community and Take 10% Off Your First Purchase The goal here is to capture an email address so you don’t have to pay to market to these folks again. You’ll then retarget traffic that lands on the page, but doesn’t convert (i.e. give you an email address) to test a new message and offer.
Mid-FunnelRe-targeting CampaignWith Facebook Dynamic Ads, make it easy on yourself and send those folks back to product pages for similar products. Use landing pages in this segment to drive home positive sentiment after purchase. Do you have tons of social proof? Or a particular story about a customer who used your product for something really cool? Or do they just love your brand? Share those stories on landing pages to turn traffic that browsed to traffic that bought.Experience [the product] for yourself. OR Add to bag/ checkout. The goal here is to drive to purchase through social or other customer proof points which are shown to increase customer trust in your brand and solidify conversions. You’ll be doing this simultaneously with Dynamic Retargeting Ads. Note: You do not have to do this with all products. Test it out with products you know drive high customer lifetime value and customer loyalty first.
Bottom of FunnelUpsell CampaignYou are likely already running an abandoned cart campaigns back to that customer’s checkout. Great. Use landing pages to upsell additional, related products or bundles to either close the sales at a higher price, or have the customer buying again. You can also use discount codes in these – though it is best to test your audience with a bundle strategy first.Get the better bundle, now. Your goal here is to first, close the sale. And second, to ideally close the sale with a higher average order value. Look through your top performing products and see what you could bundle those with across your site. Then, create a landing page promoting those bundles specifically to audiences who have abandoned cart. This is a great way to avoid discount promotions after cart abandonment and grow top-live revenue sale-by-sale.
Already PurchasedRe-engagement CampaignRe-engagement campaigns are targeted at increasing customer lifetime loyalty (LTV) and repeat purchases (retention). Make customers feel special by offering them first access to new products, campaigns and collections before the rest of the world. You do this by creating an un-indexed landing page. Be an early adopter. OR Get the goods before anyone else. Your customers are your VIPs. Make sure they are treated like it.

Now, let’s look at examples.

1. Top-of-funnel landing pages.

  • Typical campaign type: Lookalike audiences

The Strategy

Create a landing pages that tells your brand story including who you are, why you exist and what you believe in.

Also show off social proof (from customers and media outlets, if possible) and begins to build community with the lookalike audience.

The CTA

  • Join the Community and Take 10% Off Your First Purchase

The goal here is to capture an email address so you don’t have to pay to market to these folks again.

You’ll then retarget traffic that lands on the page, but doesn’t convert (i.e. give you an email address) to test a new message and offer.

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How to find this audience

Begin with a list of your current customers – or your VIP customers – which you can find here.

Note: This works best if you are B2C brand.

Upload that list into Facebook to create a Lookalike audience.

Build a landing page using a BigCommerce webpage or an app like ShoGun.

Launch your Facebook campaign and measure results.

2. Mid-funnel landing pages.

  • Typical campaign type: Re-Targeting Campaigns

The Strategy

With Facebook Dynamic Ads, make it easy on yourself and send those folks back to product pages for similar products.

Use landing pages in this segment to drive home positive sentiment after purchase.

  • Do you have tons of social proof?
  • Or a particular story about a customer who used your product for something really cool?
  • Or do they just love your brand?

Share those stories on landing pages to turn traffic that browsed to traffic that bought.

The CTA

  • Experience [the product] for yourself.
  • Add to bag/ checkout.

The goal here is to drive to purchase through social or other customer proof points which are shown to increase customer trust in your brand and solidify conversions.

You’ll be doing this simultaneously with Dynamic Retargeting Ads.

Note: You do not have to do this with all products. Test it out with products you know drive high customer lifetime value and customer loyalty first.

How to find this audience

Within Facebook, re-target those who clicked-through specific ads with relevant landing page content.

Set up that landing page using either a BigCommerce webpage or an app like ShoGun.

3. Bottom-of-funnel landing pages.

  • Typical campaign type: Upsell Campaigns

The Strategy

You are likely already running an abandoned cart campaigns back to that customer’s checkout.

Great.

Use landing pages to upsell additional, related products or bundles to either close the sales at a higher price, or have the customer buying again.

You can also use discount codes in these – though it is best to test your audience with a bundle strategy first.

The CTA

  • Get the better bundle, now.

Your goal here is to first, close the sale. And second, to ideally close the sale with a higher average order value.

Look through your top performing products and see what you could bundle those with across your site.

Then, create a landing page promoting those bundles specifically to audiences who have abandoned cart.

This is a great way to avoid discount promotions after cart abandonment and grow top-live revenue sale-by-sale.

How to find this audience

Go to your View But Did Not Purchase report in BigCommerce and download the emails.

Find which of the products within the list are most abandoned – or you can see that in this specific report in BigCommerce Insights.

Create a bundle to increase final checkout appeal for the product. Use the following report in BigCommerce Insights to see which products folks buy most often with other ones.

Chances are, those two would make a really great bundle.

4. Already purchased landing pages.

  • Typical campaign type: Re-engagement, LTV, retention campaigns

The Strategy

Re-engagement campaigns are targeted at increasing customer lifetime loyalty (LTV) and repeat purchases (retention).

Make customers feel special by offering them first access to new products, campaigns and collections before the rest of the world.

You do this by creating an un-indexed landing page.

The CTA

  • Be an early adopter.
  • Get the goods before anyone else.

Your customers are your VIPs. Make sure they are treated like it.

Maximize Top of Funnel Leads

Relevance is going to be your key competitive advantage in 2018.

You’re not going to be able to pull that off without becoming as 1:1 as possible in your communications with your top-of-funnel prospects.

It all starts on-site by identifying your audience through opt-in campaigns. Join BounceX and BigCommerce as we guide you through how identification begins on your site and how to guide the customer journey to increase opt-ins.

Reserve your seat now.

How to find this audience

Either use your entire customer list, or section out your VIP customers from your BigCommerce Insights report.

This is the same audience you used for your Facebook Lookalike Campaign above. 

Download their emails and give them a specific customer group in which only they can see specific products.

Now, launch a landing page using either built-in webpages and the BigCommerce Buy Button or an app like ShoGun to showcase the products.

4 Key Elements Every Page on Your Site Must Have

Every landing page you build will be hyper-personalized for the audience who sees it.

But, every audience is influenced by many of the same things, including:

  • Context.
  • Clarity.
  • Perceived value.
  • Relevancy.

This is true for product pages as well (even category pages!).

Every page you build on your site needs to do these 4 things incredibly well.  

1. Create undeniable value on every page.

In a world where every consumer has an infinite number of options for nearly any given product at their fingertips — where Forbes whispers of the death of loyalty — ensuring that your visitors understand why they should buy from your brand is crucial.

Unfortunately, that undeniable value that sets your brand apart from the rest is very rarely clear outside of the homepage or the About Us page.

Just look at this standard product landing page.

Note: This is not a BigCommerce site. You can view all of BigCommerce’s optimized themes, templates and landing pages here. Industry leaders like Theme Forest have also designed optimized themes for BigCommerce customers

The problem here isn’t actually with the template, but with what most ecommerce retailers do (or don’t do) with that template.

Think about the new visitor engaging with a Facebook Lookalike product ad for sandals.

  1. She clicks through the ad and lands directly on a product page that probably looks similar to the templated one above.
  2. She sees the sandals, they’re cute, but she could probably get similar ones on Amazon for a cheaper price.
  3. And finally, she clicks back and continues browsing Facebook.

What wasn’t clear to this new user when she landed on the product page was all the details that would have likely motivated her to engage further:

  • An expiring promotion on sandals or free shipping, returns, and exchanges
  • Or the fact that for every pair purchased, another pair is donated to a woman in need

In other words, since the home page is no longer the sole landing page, it is up to you to ensure every page on your website resonates with value.

And why shouldn’t it?

Most retailers have specific value propositions — whether pricereturn policy, brand story, or social responsibility.

Those elements are a part of your business for a reason, why not share them with your consumers, especially if they will drive value for your business in return.

Here are a few examples of product pages (which can easily be turned into landing pages!) that include valuable information typically on Homepage or About Us pages – from the headline right through the details — and how these retailers weave in those storylines.

Examples of the best ecommerce landing pages

Handpicked Wines‘ Product Page

My Magic Mud Product Page

Atlanta Light Bulbs’ Product Page

This one is a bit more traditional, but still follows similar rules of visibility to show consumers the value in buying with them.

2. Make it easy.

What this really boils down to is the 3-Second Rule, or the theory that:

You have roughly 3 seconds the capture a visitor’s attention.

Otherwise, they’re gonezo.

So, with this in mind, it is crucial to ensure that on every landing page, a consumer can answer the following questions within 3 seconds:

  1. Who you are and what do you do
  2. Why you are of value or of interest to them
  3. What they should do next

Let’s look back at that templated product page we saw earlier.

Note: This is not a BigCommerce site. You can view all of BigCommerce’s optimized themes, templates and landing pages here. Industry leaders like Theme Forest have also designed optimized themes for BigCommerce customers

Now, step back, close your eyes, and open them for 3-seconds.

Can you answer the above three questions?  

I can’t — and not just because this is a templated page.

Per #1, we are already working on ensuring who you are and your value is reflected across every page.

But what about what they should do next?

In the above image, that next step is lost in plethora of page distractions. Even the add to cart button is barely visible at the bottom of the page.

This type of convoluted landing page design is not conducive to seamlessly making a purchase.

My eyes even have to move down the page to see the discounted price, and the discount itself is tiny!  

Additionally, while the product image is large and clear, I don’t really understand the associated labels.

If it’s “HOT” because of the price, shouldn’t that great discount be reflected prominently?

When it comes to making the purchase decision, consumers are flooded with hesitations:

  • Do I really need it?
  • Is it too expensive?
  • Could I find it cheaper?
  • Is it worth the investment?
  • Why should I trust them? (queue social proof)

It is up to the landing page to alleviate those hesitations.

On product pages, this means ensuring clear product images along with prominent CTAs and easily understood value propositions.

We haven’t hit on category pages too much in this post, but let me reiterate, these tips are for every page on your site.

So, on category pages, this means making sure your product images are clear as shoppers scroll through in addition to ensuring customers understand the product offerings.

In this example, while scrolling through the category page, a few things are immediately clear:

  • Value: Free Sample & Free Shipping and Returns
  • Product: Large, clear product images
  • Product Options: the “more shades” tags give interested users another reason to click
  • Next Step: persistent “Add to Bag CTA”

The brand took the idea of motivating the user to take action to the next step.

By creating the “Add to Bag” CTA button, they have simplified the checkout process, giving users the ability to easily add items to their cart.

Every ecommerce landing page (and really every page of your website) should be created with the goal of getting your user to take the next-most productive step.

Once a user has made it to a category or product page, they have essentially told you what they are interested in.

It’s up to you and your pages to ensure they are.

3: Identify the right traffic.

Now that you’ve optimized the general landing page experience across your website, it’s time to take it one step further.

Of course, it is neither feasible nor wise to try to create hyper-personalized landing page experiences for every individual arriving at your website.

Instead, you should focus on the highest-value cohorts of your traffic.

These are not only the ones you have invested your budget toward, but they are also the individuals you know you can motivate to take productive action with your business.

But, how do you identify the right traffic?

As mentioned earlier, start by diving into your website analytics.  

Specifically look into your top traffic sources, not only from a traffic volume perspective but also from a revenue perspective.

These sources typically include Email, Paid Search, Organic Search, and Direct, to name a few.

Once you have pinpointed those top traffic sources, dig even deeper and look at the specific campaigns responsible.

  • Do those jumps in traffic arise from specific marketing emails or promotions?
  • Are they a result of cart abandonment ads on Facebook?
  • Are there specific search terms you have ads for that are just killing it for you?

By sifting through all of these details, you’ll be able to get a clear understanding of which specific cohorts of traffic are the most valuable to your business.

If you are using an analytics solution like BigCommerce’s Insights, you can easily see reports that take this a step further.

Here is a taste.

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Marketing Insights Reports

In this section, you can dive into customer lifetime value by channel on day 1, 90 and 180.

This will help you understand which channels (AdWords, Email, Facebook, etc.) drive the highest lifelong loyalty and repeat purchase rates.

What is this helpful for?

Understanding where to put your ad dollars to drive consumers back to your product landing pages for purchase.

Here are the three reports you get.

Here is what the 90 day report looks like, and how you can download the data to further investigate.

Product Insights Reports

Here, you can dive into which products (and subsequently product landing pages) are performing the best, and which need a little work.

This data is pulled based on individual product conversion rate data. So, if its a rock star product, it is likely a rock star landing page.

Further, you can use this data with the Marketing Insights data to understand which products to market for the highest return on ad spend.

Moreover, you can use these insights to see which products are bought together most often.

This is a good indicator of what additional products to include on landing pages for upsell opportunities.

Customer Insights Reports

With these reports, you can dive into various customer cohorts including:

  • Best customers
  • Customers at risk
  • Low AOV customers
  • Customer lifetime value (30, 90, and 180 days)
  • Customer lifetime value by product (day 1, 90 and 180)
  • Best products for repeat purchase (By month)

This data is helpful for understanding customer behavior on your site, which products drive loyalty and creating landing pages that best attract high AOV and full-price customers.

Most useful, however, is to use this data for retargeting on Facebook to earn more “Best customers” using already known characteristics of that cohort.

Here are the full reports you have access to:

4. Behavioral marketing.

Once you have optimized landing pages and product pages, and you know who to target, you can begin to use behavioral marketing to really personalize every aspect of your site.

When any visitor lands on your website, you should be able to detect a couple of things with the proper tagging and a behavioral marketing partner like BounceX:

  1. If it’s her first time onsite
  2. If she came through an ad and what type
  3. Which ad specifically and the content of that ad

Since you’ve already identified your most valuable traffic-driving campaigns, you can target the individuals who come through those experiences with behavioral marketing tactics.

So now, when that new user clicks through your Facebook Lookalike ad and lands on your sandals product page for the first time, two things will occur simultaneously:

  1. She’ll likely remain onsite longer because your unique value propositions are clear
  2. She’ll understand that the sandals are on sale for a limited time only

Both of these are a result of your on page optimizations.

With behavioral marketing, you can add a third element to the optimization process.

Here’s the scenario:

Knowing this shopper is a new prospect who has never purchased from you before, you know she’s going to need slightly more convincing before she agrees to purchase from you and likely won’t make the purchase in her first visit.  

So, as she’s clicking through the product images and demonstrating clear interest, you respond to her behavior by offering her ‘Free Shipping’ when she enters her email address.

Now, you’ve not only captured her information in case she abandons but you’ve also given her another reason to buy from you today. It’s people-based marketing, people.

Executive Summary

Every page on your website is should be optimized for perceived value and brand storytelling to drive conversion.

However, there are critical differences between landing pages and product pages.

These differences have to do with attribution, and effectively measuring your ROAS and ROI for specific audience segments.

Whether you are looking to drive net new customers or increase retention, landing pages are a silo-ed view into specific customer behavior and CRO that can help your grand grow far beyond $20,000,000 in annual revenue.

This is the ground floor to forecasting. It is how to make sure attribution at your brand is never convoluted. It is how you begin to build a testing culture.

Landing pages are how you ultimately build a brand from $5,000,000 to $20,000,000 and beyond.

Maximize Top of Funnel Leads

Relevance is going to be your key competitive advantage in 2018.

You’re not going to be able to pull that off without becoming as 1:1 as possible in your communications with your top-of-funnel prospects.

It all starts on-site by identifying your audience through opt-in campaigns. Join BounceX and BigCommerce as we guide you through how identification begins on your site and how to guide the customer journey to increase opt-ins.

Reserve your seat now.

Want more insights like this?

We’re on a mission to provide businesses like yours marketing and sales tips, tricks and industry leading knowledge to build the next house-hold name brand. Don’t miss a post. Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

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